For years the City’s plan to reduce GHG emissions from transportation has depended on efforts to move people out of single-occupancy vehicles into shared vehicles and buses, bicycles, and foot travel. It is increasingly being predicted that surface transportation will soon be dominated by self-driving, electric-powered vehicles owned by large organizations and rented to users on a ride-by-ride basis. Do you think this prediction will be fulfilled in the next 20 years? If yes, how should the City prepare for, and respond to this new transportation reality?
Cindy
Carlisle
The City’s measures to protect pollinators – stopping the use of neonicotinoids, urging others to do that, and sponsoring education programs and celebrations of pollinators in collaboration with nonprofit organizations and CU – all need to be continued. By encouraging the efforts of organic landscaping and lawn care companies and providing incentives for additional companies to follow their lead, the city could make another great leap in protecting pollinators. Also, by advancing the use of native species of wildflowers and grasses throughout the city, as OSMP and the Native Plant Society have been doing, hundreds of native pollinators will regain habitat. All city properties and new developments should be demonstration landscapes with pollinator-friendly plantings and practices.