The tax on City electric bills that funds the City's municipalization efforts is due to expire the end of 2017. What is your position on renewing the tax in this election year?
Sam
Weaver
Building on four years of hard work for our community and my experience in the business, civic, and environmental arenas, I’ll continue to lead on vital local issues of concern, including:
- Maintaining a healthy business environment for the long term;
- Achieving aggressive carbon emissions reductions; and
- Supporting a sustainable community that actively cares for those in need.
I’m a founder of a Boulder–based clean energy technology company. As a job creator and innovator, I understand the world of Boulder’s start-up businesses. Our entrepreneurial culture is important to the community and should be nourished by the public sector. The largest of local businesses create economic stability and enable spin-offs and startups to innovate and grow. For ten years prior to starting my own business, I worked as a researcher at the University of Colorado. I understand first-hand the significant contributions that the university, Federal labs and the scientific community make to the local economy. As a Council member, I’ve bolstered and supported these important sectors.
I served on Boulder’s Planning Board in 2012, before being elected to Council in 2013. I deeply understand local land use issues and the how to effectively regulate growth and development in our community. With the support of fellow Council members and staff, I’ve helped implement some of the nation’s best commercial energy codes; rolled out commercial recycling and composting regulations; and supported adoption of some of the most energy-efficient new building codes in the country. In addition, the City organization has made great progress in reducing its own carbon emissions over the last four years while we’ve moved forward on exploring a local municipal electric utility.
I’ve consistently lobbied for increasing City support of our critical local nonprofits. How different our community would be without EFFA, Bridge House, VIA, Mental Health Partners, and many other community service organizations, including the City affordable housing and EXPAND programs. I support policies and organizations that achieve housing access and supply, while retaining a low-rise, compact city character.
Given the unfortunate state of the nation’s current leadership and political polarization, I believe local government should take even more progressive action. I am convinced that Boulder, of all places in the United States, has the ability to lead through environmentally sound initiatives, including a local clean electric utility, additional resilience programs such as community gathering places during crises, and a continuing focus on energy efficiency. At the same time, Boulder needs to lead the way in minimizing the impacts of natural gas, both in its extraction and in its use. Since 2008, my wife Maggie and I have lived in the Whittier area. In this eminently walkable neighborhood, there is diversity among residents and property types, a situation that is more and more challenging to preserve in the face of rapidly escalating home prices. Maintaining a range of housing options for Boulder residents is a priority for me, and I will fight for it if elected.